New funding to understand link between Mediterranean diet and fertility

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New grant to investigate the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet on fertility and reproductive outcomes in couples who are struggling to conceive

Dr Stephanie Cowan, an early career researcher in MCHRI’s lifestyle team, has been awarded a MERCK FSANZ Leaders in Dr Innovation/ Fertility Research Grant to further understand the effect that a Mediterranean diet has on fertility. 

Dr Cowan’s research project, Efficacy and Feasibility of a Mediterranean Diet on Fertility and Reproductive Outcomes in Sub-Fertile Couples Seeking IVF Treatment has received the maximum amount of $25,000 through the Fertility Society of Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ), which is also sponsored by the scientific organisation, Merck.

“Evidence from observational studies suggests that the Mediterranean diet – a health-promoting dietary patterns associated with regular consumptions of vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, unprocessed cereals, and extra-virgin olive oil – is associated with improved fertility outcomes that may be related to factors including its anti-inflammatory potential and increased antioxidant content. It is currently unstudied in intervention trials.”

The FSANZ grant will enable Dr Cowan to investigate the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet on fertility and reproductive outcomes in couples who are struggling to conceive.

Dr Cowan currently works as a post-doctoral researcher with Associate Professor Lisa Moran. This is her first successful grant as a Chief Investigator.

“This grant will help to further my endeavours to promote and improve the delivery of evidence-based lifestyle management in women’s health, targeting key life stages of pre-conception, during pregnancy and post-partum.”

Read more about the work of the Lifestyle Team.


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